Why does the Author of “We were Soldiers Once…” Hate America?

Joseph Galloway, author of the book “We were Soldiers Once, and Young” and the senior military correspondent for Knight Ridder Newspapers, thinks Don Rumsfeld is on pace to destroy the United States Army.

An excerpt from the article:

Armies are fragile institutions, and for all their might, easily broken.

It took the better part of 20 years to rebuild the Army from the wreckage of Vietnam. With the hard work of a generation of young officers, blooded in Vietnam and determined that the mistake would never be repeated, a new Army rose Phoenix-like from the ashes of the old, now perhaps the finest Army in history.

In just over three years, Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld and his civilian aides have done just about everything they could to destroy that Army.

He thinks Oliver North is a punk-ass, brown nose, too. I think I am going to read buy two copies of his book this week.

5 Comments

  1. KnightRidder Washington Bureau, Joe Galloway.

    We Were Soldiers FICTION

    KnightRidder’s Military Consultant Joe Galloway never served in the Military

    In a message dated 1/15/2004 3:23:36 PM Pacific

    Standard Time,

    jgalloway@krwashington.com writes:

    like i say russell, if you had anything worth taking i would sue you for libel and slander and take it all. but you don’t. only a couple bottles of blue pills which you need to use more regularly.

    Forwarded Message:

    Subj: RE: My web Page is now on the 1st page of Joseph L. Galloway We Were Soldiers=FICTION
    Date: 1/15/2004 3:23:36 PM Pacific Standard Time

    From: jgalloway@krwashington.com
    To: LZXRAY111765@aol.com
    Sent from the Internet (Details)

    like i say russell, if you had anything worth taking i would sue you for libel and slander and take it all. but you don’t. only a couple bottles of blue pills which you need to use more regularly.

    Russell L. Ross
    1741 Maysong ct
    San Jose, CA. 95131-2727
    408 926-9336

    This is the 2nd Rewrite of We Were Soldiers Once and Young, I,m still looking for the 1st, In the 1st. verson Galloway writes Col. Moore was told to stay out of the mountains. I will pay up to $100.00 or more for that article. It was in Military type Magzine, like Soldier Of Fortune also.

    BY JOSEPH L. GALLOWAY KnightRidder’s Military Consultant.

    JOSEPH L. GALLOWAY, PLAGERIST, LIAR, CONMAN.

    JOE GALLOWAY News > Iraq: The Aftermath > Monday, Jan 05, 2004

    Joe Galloway

    Joe Galloway “Not just Rumsfeld,

    but all of his “civilian experts”who never wore a

    uniform.” >Not just Rumsfeld, but all of his civilian

    experts who never wore a uniform.

  2. Fiction We Were Soldiers Once and Young X-Ray part.

    Page references are from the Hardback.

    FICTION:

    Fabarication applies particulary to a false but carefully invented statement or a

    series of statements, in which some truth is sometimes interwoven, the whole usually

    intended to deceive.

    The Greatest Hero

    “People everywhere are smitten- With a tale that is written.

    Once a hero’s deeds are known- They’re as good as etched in stone.

    Every word, folks take to heart- And think this makes them very smart.

    Amazing how the very wise- Never stop to realize- That what they read may not be true.

    Groo

    Moral: Even when the words are true the may not speak the truth. Groo

    Can you make Col. Klink ( Moore ) and Rambo the Reporter (Galloway ) into hero’s?

    Lt. Col. Moore was the Col. Klink of the war?

    Moore knew “Nothing!! Nothing!! ” about AirAssault tatics.

    Page 17
    Moore’s new concepts & techniques were written in the 1950’s Field Manual 57-35 Army

    Transport Avation-Combat Operations, 1963 Feild Manual 57-35 Airmobile Operations.

    By Officers he worked with in 1957.

    Moore in 1957 “I was in on the concept of Airmobility with Gavin, Norton, Seneff Williams”.

    With 2 1/2 years writing, 1 1/2 years training in Airmobile tatics in the 11 Air Assault

    Division Test, for a total of 4 years!

    Yet he retained nothing about Airmobile tatics.

    Page 37
    Crandall “Moore wanted Aviation present, to be part of his Staff”.

    Moore, Crandall or his ALO had to coordinate the flight time from Plei Me to X-Ray, flight

    routes, fire support, resuppy, Medevac Huey and many other things.

    Moore couldnt plan the operation with out Crandall ( aviation ) present.

    Page 60
    As Crandall flared the huey to land at Landing Zone X-Ray, Moore & his troops starts firing

    their weapons.

    FM 57-35
    There is no firing from the helicopter during flight, landing or any other time.

    Pity the troop to their right a face full of hot brass, left ear drums ringing, brass rolling

    around on the floor or getting caught in the Huey’s controls.

    They say Moore who had been listening to the battle of Landing Zone Albany on the radio,

    voluntered for the 1st Battalion 7th Cavalry to go to Columbus to guard the artillary, So the

    2nd Battalion 5th Cavalry could go and reinforce ALBANY.

    MYTHS of The Ia Drang Valley
    Some Officers even Kinnard stated that Moore voluntered to go into ALBANY, But he didnÃt

    and from Persons in the book, That Moore and Galloway write good about give in return and

    adds to the MYTHS about the 1/7 and Moore.

    One Reporter Bob Poos of Soldier of Fortune writes that Moore and the 1st Battalion 7th

    Cavalry was the ones who relived the Plie me camp.

    Soldier of Fortune March 83 page 29-30

    ARVN AMBUSH 3rd column last 2 paragraphs.

    Plie Me did get relief- with a vengeance- from the 1st Cavalry Division.

    Through a strange coincidance, the camp commander Capt Harold Moore Learned later that

    much of the relief force was commanded by a name sake, Lt. Col. Harold Moore

    commander of the 1st Battalion 7th Cavalry.

    When in fact it was my old unit the 2nd Battalion 8th Cavalry.

    Capt. George Forrest when he spoke to the Old Guard saying Lt. Col. Moore was there in

    the 11AAD in 1963.

    So starts the myths about Lt. Col. Moore and the 1st Battalion 7th Cavalry.

    Moore idea would cost time becouse the 1st Battalion 7th Cavalry would have fly to

    Columbus 4 hours, Then the 2nd Battalion 5th Cavalry would have to be flown to Albany

    another 4 hours.

    8 hours to renforce Albany?

    So why didnÃt Kinnard send the 1st Battalion 7th Cavalry to reinforce ALBANY?

    They were probally to drunk?

    They had spent the day of the 17th in the Bars of Pleiku.

    The most Outrageous LIE Page 287.

    At Landing Zone Albany.

    There on the dying enemy soldier something shiny.

    A big battered old French army Bugle.

    FACT:
    This Bugle was captured at Landing Zone X-Ray and brought into Landing Zone Albany by

    the reinforcements.

    Leadership Principle 1

    Be Technically and Tactically Proficent.

    To know you job thoroughly, you must posses not only specific knowledge of its details but

    also a broad general knowledge concerning its area of intrest.

    You should be competent in combat operations and training as well as in the technical and

    admimistrative aspects of your duties.

    If you demonstrate deficincies in these functions,Your subordinates will lose confidance in

    you as a leader.

    Moore under the delusion he has come up with a new Air Assault tatic for the 1st lift,

    Would doom his men and for the want of a nail the 2nd Battalion 7th Cavalry.

    As the Battle of Landing Zone X-Ray would grind up, The Troops, Helicopters and Artillary.

    Making them unavalible for other units.

    Leading to the walk to Landing Zone Albany by the 2/7.

    What happend?

    It would appear Moore would be the first one chosen by Kinnard for the 11 AIr Assault test,

    When it started up in 1963 but he wasnt.

    Moore had To write a letter to Major General Kinnard ( His Old Boss ) begging for a Infantry

    Battalion in the 11 air Assault Division.

    It wasent till 1964, 1 year after it started Moore got the call.

    He didnt get one with the 11 Air Assault but instead was given a Infantry Battalion in the 2

    infantry Division.

    The 2nd Battalion 23rd Infantry. They were then attached to the 11AirAssault test.

    Moore Had never commanded a Infantry Battalion before.

    But one of the hand picked officers by Kinnard in 1963 was Lt. Col McDade, He was chosen

    for the G-1 spot, He would be given command of the 2nd Battilion 7th Cavalry around

    November 7,1965 aproximately 10 days before the battle of Landing Zone Albany.

    McDade Had never Commanded a Infantry Battalion before.

    THERE WAS ANOTHER FACTOR, MOORE AND MCDADE WERE HAVING A POWER

    STRUGGLE.

    Keep abreast of current military devolopements.

    Moore “I thought up a new technique for the inital lift.”

    There are only two types of Air assaults.

    Moore under the delusion he had come up with a new technique.

    The Ground Commander ( Moore ) must concider 2 general types of Airmobile assaults

    when preparing the ground tatical plan.

    These types of assaults differ primarily in the proximity of the Landing Zone to the objective.

    The first and preferred type is the landing of the assault ehelons immediately on or adjacent

    to the objective.

    The secound type of assault involves landing a distance from the objective( in a secure )

    Landing Zone and requires assembly, reorganization, and movement to an attack position

    prior to the assault on the objective.

    Some simulare characteristics of Moore and Custer.

    When no one wrote about them.

    They wrote their own Books.

    Both were considered too Flamboyent, by fellow officers, And not well liked.

    George Armstrong Custer ( His men called him yellow hair ) Commander of the 1st Battalion

    7th Cavalry at the battle of the Little Bighorn.

    The Indians would wipe the 1st Battalion 7th Cavalry out to a man.

    Starting the Indian wars.

    The UNITED STATES would unite and almost wipe out all the Indians taking their lands and

    putting them on Reservations.

    LT. Col. Harold G. Moore ( His men called him yellow hair ) Commander 1st Battalion 7th

    Cavalry at the battle of Landing Zone X-Ray November the 14,1965 Pleiku Provance of South

    Vietnam.

    Moore’s men with help from the reinforcement’s ( Bco 2nd Battalion 7th Cavalry ) saves

    Landing Zone X-RAY.

    Starting the Vietnam war.

    Which almost tears the United States apart.

    Both Battles ( The Little Bighorn ) and ( Landing Zone X-Ray ) were fought by the 1st

    Battalion 7th Cavalry.

    On a Sunday, In a Valley, By a River, In tall Grass and near a Large Mountian or Hill top.

    Both Commanders were told the size of the enemy troops.

    By their Scouts.

    But didnt belive them.

    Scout to Custer “There is a very very large Indian camp down there.”

    Custer “Where I dont see any camp.”

    Intelligence Lieutenant to Col. Moore “There is the possibiy of a PAVN Regiment near the

    Chu Pong mountain.

    10 minutes before lift off Moore was told he was facing 2,000 enemy troops!!

    Moore that didn’t really bother me.

    Both the Commanders wanted to force the Enemy to stand and fight.

    As the enemy’s tatics were hit and run.

    Custer in the lead charges into the valley his troops behind. to cut off the Indians, So they

    couldn’t escape on to the plains.

    Moore in the lead Huey charges in to the Valley his troop behind would be the first one on

    Landing Zone X-Ray, hopeing the North Vietnamese or the Viet Cong wouldn’t excape in to

    the mountians and into Cambodia.

    Both would get their wish.

    The Indians and North Vietnamese would send 1,000 or more men out to meet the 1st

    Battalion 7th Cavalry.

    The Commanders then realized that the size of the enemy forces was true.

    Their scouts were right, They were out numbered.

    Both battles were defensive.

    After the initial charge by the 1st Battalion 7th Cavalry, They would pull back, Circle the

    wagons and let the enemy throw them selves at their defense’s.

    Custer didn’t have renforcements, It would take weeks to get them, His supplies were miles

    behind him.

    The 1st Battalion 7th Cavalry was wiped out to the man.

    Moore didnt have that problem “I had something Custer didn’t, Reinforcements with in

    Hours.

    Moore forgot to lay on supplies and water for his troops.

    Moore’s Men with the help of the Reinforcements ( Bco 2nd Battalion 7th Cavalry ) save

    Landing Zone X-Ray.

    Starting the Vietrnam War.

    It would almost destroy the United States.

    Their Troops FOUGHT VALIANTLY.

    What happend to Moore’s H-hour?

    Moore Get’s his H-hour confused with the Attack time in the mission order.

    H-hour in air assault terms is difined as the time the lead helicopter touches down on the

    Landing Zone.

    Moore puts the H-hour at H-1030.

    He then gets word the Artillary cant fire until H-1017.

    H-hour get delayed. 1 incremint? ( usually 15 minutes ).

    So that should make H-hour, H-1045.

    But Moore ( who is in the lead Huey ) dosent set foot on LZ X-Ray until H-1048.

    3 minutes late.

    Fiction to Lt. Col. Moore and Joseph L. Galloway’s parts.

    The enlisted men, Officers, Junior Officers and the 2/5, Bco 2/7 and 2/7 Battalion stories

    cannot be disputed.

    Moore couldnt READ a MAP?

    Page 30
    November 9, 1965 Moore “What does the RED STAR that is on the intelligence map

    mean?”

    The Red Star is not a military symbol its explanation should have been on the lower right

    side ( margin ) of the map.

    Moore ” I had no doubt the 1/7 my Battalion would be chosen to mount the attack into the

    Ia Drang as the 2/7 had a new commander.

    Fact!! ” the 1/7 was closer to the objective then the 2/7 ” and had nothing to do with the

    readiness of the Battalions. ( Gen. John J. Tolson ).

    Page 17
    Moore’s new concepts & techniques were written in the 1950’s FM 57-35 Army Transport

    Avation-Combat Operations.

    and following manuals.

    1960’s FM 57-35 Airmobile Operations.

    By Officers he worked with in 1957?!

    Page 17
    1957 Moore “I was in on the concept of Airmobility with Pentagon Reasearch and

    developement group.

    Moore “I was the 1st man in the Airborne Branch”.

    With 4 years, writing Manual FM 57-35 Airmobile Operations and training in Airmobile

    tatics.

    Yet Moore retained nothing about Airmobile tatics.

    Page 41
    Moore “I thought up a new technique for the inital lift”.

    There are only 2 types of Air assaults.

    This is the 2 one.

    Page 37
    Crandall “Moore wanted Aviation to be present, to be part of his Staff”

    FM 57-35>Both the Ground Commander ( Moore ) and Aviation Commander ( Crandall ) or

    his ALO had to coordinate>flight time from Plei Me to X-Ray, flight routes, resuppy.

    Moore couldnt plan the operation with out Avation present.

    FM 57-35
    Key personnel are distributed among the aircraft of the lift so the loss of one aircraft does

    not destroy the command structure.

    Page 58
    Moore and Crandall in the same Huey.

    Page 59
    The lift is flying at 110 knots.

    FM 57-35
    When diffrent types of aircraft fly in a single lift, cruising speed of the slower aircraft must be

    the controlling speed of the lift.

    UH-1B’s are Gunships fly at 80 knots ( Weapons and Ammo’s weight ) UH-1D’s are Slicks

    110 knots.

    I ask Bco’s 1/7 3rd Platoon Leader Dennis Deal, why didnt Moore lay on water for his men

    B co would be on the LZ for over 4 hours and why he said it was “not” Aviations job to

    haul out Wounded Troops.

    B co’s 1/7 3rd Platoon Leader Dennis Deal “Dont ask me I knew nothing about Airmobile

    tatics.”

    Page 106
    Moore we needed water, medical supplies and ammo.

    Page 107
    Bco 1/7 3rd Platoon Leader Dennis Deal by 3pm we ran out of water, the wounded kept

    begging for water.

    Page 145
    November 15, 1965 at 6:20am Jemison shared his last drops of water.

    Page 112
    November 14, 1965 While all day long the Battalion Supply Officer was riding in and out of

    X-Ray & Galloway came.

    240# of water, medical, ammo not coming in, 1 Wounded troop not going out.

    Page 106
    Moore “hauling Wounded was not the slick crews job” ( Aviation )

    Feild Manual 7-20 the Battalion Commanders hanbook,

    Hauling wounded is the secoundary mission of all military aircraft.

    Page 63
    Moore used his command Huey to haul out a non wounded POW.

    Page 167
    But none his “wounded troops”, Lt Franklin terribly wounded was set aside to die.

    FM 1-100 Army Aviation
    The Command and Control Huey is to be used for Command and Control ONLY it shouldnt

    be used for anyother purpose, like RESUPPLY. .

    A Medevac Huey was suppose to fly with the assault echelon ( 1st Lift )

    Page 105
    A wounded troop was stumbling toward the aid station, Galloway ” stay away go back” what

    was this 17 year old’s thoughts 20 feet from the aid station and treatment and told to stay

    away?

    FM 57-35
    Page 12 paragraph 24 supply 6 miscellaneous.

    a. probable water supply points are predesingnated. and comes in with the fowllowing

    echelons.

    FM 7-20
    Page 271 paragraph 313 returning aircraft may be used for the evacuation of casualities.

    Galloway had no military service.

    COMMAND RESPONSIBILITY

    No one expects the battalion commander to act as a rifleman, no matter how proficient

    he is.

    As he does so.

    who commands his battalion?

    Who gives guidance to his Company Commanders?

    He is taking responsibility away from his men and not meeting his own.

    Page 34
    Moore “I went to school on the Division Commander, authority must be pushed down to the

    man on the spot.

    Page 40
    Moore “I personally to influence the action would be in the 1st Huey to land on X-Ray.”

    Page 60
    Moore leading his command group clear a sector of X-Ray, on the way back to the Landing

    Zone, meet the troops who were suppose to clear that sector.

    Page 73
    Moore “I was tempted to join A co or C co’s company’s men”

    Page 108
    Moore “My operations Officer`& the Avaition Liason Officer had controlled all flights into

    X-Ray, I then took control, every Huey coming to X-Ray must radio me for landing

    instructions.

    Page 109
    Crandall “Moore was now a signalman at the far end of the Landing Zone was standing up,

    directing us where to land.”

    Page 109
    The Brigade Commander had given Moore pathfinders. ( A pathfinder was in the 1st Lift )

    Page 195
    Moore “I personally lead the final counterattack to make certian that the Company

    Commander of Bco 2/7 & his men did a safe, clean, job & to look for my Missing Troops.”

    Moore didnt bring in his execuitive Officer ( 2nd in command ) to help run the battalion

    command post.

    Page 39
    Moore “we had never maneuvered in combat as a battalion”

    Page 28
    Moore “in Oct. the Battalion made 2 sweeps near An Khe.”

    Page 31
    Nov 9 Moore “We shuttled the Battalion in 16 Hueys”

    Page 32
    Nov 9 Galloway “My first time out with Moores 1/7 Battalion”

    Original story Solider of Fortune November 83 Page 25
    Nov 9 Galloway “Before nitefall Moore waved his battalion across a stream”

    UH-1 Huey Helicopter

    Each Huey could carry 10 Troops.

    The most widely used military helicopter, the Bell UH-1 series Iroquois, better known as the

    “Huey”, began arriving in Vietnam in 1963.

    Before the end of the conflict, more than 5,000 of these versatile aircraft were introduced into

    Southeast Asia.

    “Hueys” were used for MedEvac, command and control, and air assault; to transport

    personnel and materiel; and as gun ships.

    Considered to be the most widely used helicopter in the world, with more than 9,000

    produced from the 1950s to the present, the Huey is flown today by about 40 countries.

    Bell (model 205) UH-1D (1963) had a longer fuselage than previous models, increased rotor

    diameter, increased range, and a more powerful Lycoming T53-L-11 1100 shp engine, with

    growth potential to the Lycoming T53-L-13 1400 shp engine.

    A distinguishing characteristic is the larger cargo doors, with twin cabin windows, on each

    side.

    The UH-1D, redesigned to carry up to>> 12 troopsunopened parachute ( It is not meant to tell the story ) of each individual, ( or to capture the

    same kind of truth ) a documentary would.

    I salute you.

    Best regards, Randall Wallace

    The 1st Cavalry Division as the Division Commander Kinnard had to use the whole of the

    division resorces to keep Lt. Col. Moore from losing Landing Zone X-Ray.

    Kinnard “I violated a lot of priniples about how hard you work your guy’s and how many

    hour’s you fly your helicopters.”

    “I literally flew the Blades off the choppers.”

    The photographs offered are from the personal collection of Joe Galloway ( Rambo the

    Reporter ) and were taken at LZ X-Ray during and after the action in the Ia Drang Valley,

    November 14-16, 1965.

    The images reflect the savagery of the combat, a feel for the emotions of the soldiers

    involved and a sense for the terrain in which the battle was fought.

    The photographs have never before been published and most have been seen only by a

    handful of participants in the action.

    Actually some pictures have been published and seen by over 26 million people.

    These images will help put a real face on the people, places and events in the upcoming

    movie, “We Were Soldiers Once…And Young”, starring Mel Gibson.

    A film based on the book of the same name by Lt. Gen. Hal Mooore and Joe.

    Ia Drang Scholarship Fund…. As a lasting tribute to the men of the 1st of the 7th Cavalry

    who gave so much in the Ia Drang, a permanent scholarship fund was established for the

    children and grandchildren of those who died in action in this heroic event.

    To honor that commitment, 10% of the purchase price of every Joe Galloway at the Ia Drang

    photo will be donated to the fund.

    Fiction Joseph L. Galloway wrote for the. U.S. NEWS and World Report.

    Oct 29,1990
    Page 32
    Fatal Victory

    Pg 36
    Vietnam Story.

    ARTICLES Galloway Plagarized.

    U.S. News and World Report

    Oct 25, 93 Page 45
    Step by Step into a Quagmire

    SOURCE: Stanley Karnows Vietnam a History Pages 479-485.

    U.S. News and World Report
    Feb 4,1991 Page 49

    “Who’s Afraid of the truth”

    SOURCE: Soldier of Fortune Dec 84 Pg 104 Press Escorts by Fred Tucker. ( TUCKERS

    GORRILLAS ).

    In the movie Gibson portray Galloway as a Reporter who pick’s up a weapon only to protect the wounded.

    BUT!!! Galloway was the most heavely armed Reporter in Vietnam.

    Page 32
    Joseph L. Galloway Had wrangled a ride in to the Plie Me camp while it was under siege,

    and becouse of the shortages of fighters found him self assigned to a .30 cal light machine

    gun.

    With two other reporters After the battle was over Major Charles Beckwith hands Galloway

    an M-16 rifle, Galloway told Beckwith, Strictly speaking, under the Geneva Convention he

    was “A civilian noncombatant.”

    As you see there is no logic.

    Galloway has just spent 3 days maning a .30 cal machine gun killing PAVN troops and after

    the battle is over decides he is a civilian noncombatant?

    Galloway said Beckwith forced him to do it.

    The question is why didnt Galloway join the service?

    He was always to busy playing Soldier instead of being a Reporter.

    He wanted to be at any battle he could get to, to record it, But when he get’s there at the

    battle.

    He start’s to play Soldier.

    You cant write or record History, While you busy playing soldier.

    Of all the reporters in Vietnam, Galloway was the most danegerous to the Americian troops,

    in His Walter Mitty and Rambo persona.

    He had no idea what the soldier’s job was.

    He as a reporter and could do what he wanted and go where he wanted to at any time.

    Joseph L. Galloway ( Rambo the Reporter ) ROAMED all over VIETNAM

    Killing as he pleased.

    Page 35
    November 13,1965 Galloway hitched a ride from Pleiku to Catecha the 3 Brigade

    headquaters Galloway ” I dug a foxhole out on the perimeter with B company 1/7,

    Under one of those $50.00 tea bushes, set out some spare! magazines ( M-16 ).

    Galloway playing Soldier, It would have been better if he said I set out some spare film rolls.

    to record events, his mind set is playing soldier.

    Page 32 Galloway writes: ” At first lite I pinched of a small piece of C-4 explosive from the

    emergency supply in my pack and used it to boil up a canteen cup of water for coffee.

    Walter Mitty part: If you lit C-4 very carefully you could be drinking hot coffee in maybe 30

    secounds.

    If you were careless it blew your arm off.

    If Galloway was so eager to receive the Bronze Star, Then he should be ready to pay the

    price for violating the UCMJ.

    Conspiring to take a $500,000 Helicopter and receiving Military equipement, 1 M16 Rifle, 1

    Carl Gustaf.

    I had to sign for all my equipement as all soldiers did and had to turn it in when I left, If I lost

    any thing I had to pay for what was lost.

    Who did Galloway leave the M-16 with, Does he have papers saying he turned it in?

    The same with the Carl Gustaf, Where did he get it? Did he buy it, Pick it up on the

    Battlefield?

    Did he sell it when he left? If he turned it in, Does he have the paper work to show it?

    Galloway conspired with a friend ( A Huey Pilot )into flying into Plei Me camp.

    There were orders for all aircraft to stay out of the area, The friend went AWOL, He and

    Galloway took the Huey and flew into Plei Me.

    Beckwith needed, medical, and ammo.

    At Plei Me Major Charles Beckwith had put Galloway and 2 other Reporters on a

    machinegun and had given Galloway an M-16 Rifle.

    MYTH’s:
    Page 156-157
    Vincent Cantu and Galloway meet during fierce attack on D and C company’s.

    Galloway was taking pictures.

    Vincent Cantu braved the fire and sprinted to where Galloway was.

    TRUTH: Soldier of Fortune Sept 83 Page 28
    Galloway writes “During a ( LULL!!).” I met Vincent Cantu this was before the(skyhawk) naplmed the Command post.

    MYTH’s:
    Page 35
    Galloway The plantation billed the U.S. $50 for each tea bush and $250 for each rubber tree.

    TRUTH:
    Soldier of Fortune Sept 83 Page 25
    Galloway “They billed U.S.$25 for each tea bush $125 for each rubber tree”.

    Galloway only left the saftey of the Command Post During ” LULL’s ” in the Battle.

    As soon as the firing started up, He would headed right back to the Command post.

    Galloway has no action pictures.

    The picture on the front of the Book ( IS ALTERED 3 diffrent pictures TO MAKE 1 ) is by

    Petter Arnett and Rick Merron ( AP ).

    Russell L. Ross lzalbany65@aol.com from San Jose, CA

    1741 Maysong ct
    San Jose,CA 95131-2727
    PH 408 926-9336

  3. Becouse I was there, I’m an original,assigned to the 11Air assault not attached like Col. Moore

    Landing Zone Albany was nether a Ambush or a Massacure or covered up by the Army. AS STATED BY LT. COL. HAROLD G. MOORE, JOSEPH L. GALLOWAY and Forrest Sawyer of ABC NEWS from the Video They Were Young and Brave

    Before I get into my own personal account of Landing Zone Albany, I need to share with you the reader, some facts about air mobile war tactics as well as physical facts about the equipment we had to use at this point in the conflict in Vietnam. I need to share and clarify this information, since I have found in my research for developing this web site, that other authors/reporters have given out extraordinarily misleading information to the public. Whether it is a result of the inadequate knowledge of equipment, tactics or personal opinion sneaking in as ‘fact’, I feel these corrections and clarifications are important for you to truly understand the issues surrounding these truly historically pivotal events. That stated, let me begin.

    By SP/4 Russell L. Ross

    RA17630469
    D company 2nd Battalion 7th Cavalry
    Recon Platoon ( LoneRanger call sign )
    1st Cavalry Division Airmobile
    An Khe Vietnam

    B company 1st Battalion 511 Infantry ( Airborne )
    11 Air Assualt ( test )
    FT. Benning, Georgia

    B company 1/511 became
    B company 2nd Battalion 8th Cavalry ( Airborne )
    1st Cavalry Division Airmobile
    FT. Benning, Georgia.

    And I was sent to the
    2nd Battalion 7th Cavalry
    1st Cavalry Division Airmobile

    more fiction by Joe Galloway

    E-mail Joe at jgalloway@krwashington.com.

    RUSSELL L. ROSS lzalbany65@aol.com
    1741 Maysong ct
    San Jose, Ca 95131-2727
    PH 408 926-9336
    http://hometown.aol.com/lzalbany65/myhomepage/
    Joe Galloway KNIGHTRIDDERS military consultants FICTION EXPOSED

    From Soldiers the Offical U.S. Army Magazine

    An Author’s Quest Story By Helke Hasenauer about Joe Galloway. page 33

    ph 1-703-806-4486 Sun, Mar. 03, 2002March 2002>> Joe Galloway”‘Clark died and, two days later”.

    Harold G. Moore, then the 1st Battalion commander,

    didn’t learn about Galloway’s actions until the two collaborated

    on “We Were Soldiers Once . . . And Young,”

    a best-selling book about the history of the battle published in 1992.

    Moore, who retired as a three-star general, put Galloway in for the award.

    Moore’s big LIE

    “There was grazing machine-gun fire going over our heads and he got up in that grazing fire

    and ran to that soldier to save him,” Moore said.

    Galloway, crouching down to avoid enemy fire, saw PFC Jimmy Nakayama and Spc.5

    James Clark get caught by the flames.

    With the help of Sgt. George Nye, Galloway grabbed Nakayama’s feet and carried him to

    safety.

    >Clark died

    Thursday, Jun. 4, 1998

    Refugio native awarded Bronze Star

    Former UPI reporter tried to save a wounded soldier during the Vietnam War

    By STEPHANIE L. JORDAN
    Staff Writer

    BAYSIDE — For Refugio native Joe Galloway, reporting the Vietnam War meant getting away from press briefings, safe base camps and clean sheets. He saw the war as the grunts saw it, down in the dirt with the heat, death, blood, fear and valor.
    And on Nov. 15, 1965, during the first large-scale battle between American troops and the North Vietnamese Army, Galloway stopped being a United Press International reporter and became a hero.

    On May 1, 1998, Galloway — now a senior writer for U.S. News and World Report — was awarded a Bronze Star with a “V” device for valor for his actions during the battle. Galloway, who divides his time between homes in Bayside and Boston, is the first civilian to be given the award from the Army, said Maj. Gen. Joseph K. Kellogg, who presented him with the medal at Fort Bragg, N.C.

    “At that time and that place he was a soldier,” Kellogg said. “He was a soldier in spirit, he was a soldier in actions and he was a soldier in deeds.”

    Galloway was honored for trying to save a wounded soldier during one of the pivotal battles of the Vietnam War, a battle that left 234 Americans dead.

    “I know that wasn’t my job, but in those days everyone did what they could to survive and help everyone else make it out of there alive,” Galloway said.

    While with troops of the 7th Cavalry’s 1st Battalion — part of the First Cavalry Division — fighting in the Central Highlands, Galloway was in the battalion command post when an

    American fighter mistakenly dropped napalm near the position.

    Galloway, crouching down to avoid enemy fire, saw PFC Jimmy Nakayama and Spc.5 James

    Clark get caught by the flames.

    With the help of Sgt. George Nye, Galloway grabbed Nakayama’s feet and carried him to

    safety.

    ———-Joe Galloway

    >>> “Clark died > Thursday, Sep 01, 2005They Were Soldiers
    The requested article was not found.

    http://www.scottmanning.com/archives/000431.php

    Joe Galloway in 2 diffrent places at the same time 1700hrs

    Nov.14,1965 40k apart places, 1st Catecha, 2nd LZ Falcon

    http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0204/galloway3.htm

    A Reporter’s Journal From Hell
    by Joe Galloway

    Part Three: The Things We Carried…

    CATECHA
    In the morning the word passed that B Company was moving out; the whole battalion was moving out on an operation to the west of Plei Me Camp. I caught up with the Brigade Commander, Col. Tim Brown, who confirmed that for me.

    I told him I wanted to ride in with the 1st Battalion.

    Brown said it was probably going to be another long, hot walk in the sun—but I could hang around and if anything happened he would fly out in his command helicopter and I could go with him.

    I nodded but had a bad feeling about this; felt I ought to go in with the troops.

    The 1st Battalion troops lifted on out,

    replaced by Bravo Company, 2nd Battalion 7th Cav.

    1700hrs Nov 14th 1965 Catecha
    Later, when the radios burst into frenzied reports of action, Bravo 2/7 Cav began lining up

    and loading up on choppers.

    Galloway
    I slipped down the line, found one chopper with room and got

    aboard.

    Just before we lifted off a big lieutenant came down the line

    looking in every chopper.

    He spotted me, waved me off, and put a medic aboard in my seat.

    I couldn’t complain about that, but there was action out there in a place designated Landing

    Zone XRay, and I couldn’t get there.

    Back to Brigade HQ. Col. Brown came bustling out of the tent with a couple of his staff

    officers behind him.

    He waved me along, moving quickly toward his command chopper, bristling all over with radio

    antennas.

    He told me that Lt. Col. Moore and his men had gotten into a helluva fight out there in the Ia

    Drang Valley and he was headed there.

    1200hrs Nov 14th,1965 LZ XRay 1200hrs
    > As we neared the end of the 20 mile flight we could easily locate the battlefield: cloud of

    smoke rose high above it.

    We dropped down to about 1500 feet circling the clearing below.

    I had earphones on and could hear Col. Brown talking to Lt. Col. Moore. Brown wanted to

    land; Moore was telling him the landing zone was under intense enemy fire and if he landed

    that command chopper with all those antennas it would be a magnet for bullets.

    Moore succeeded in waving off his boss.

    aprox 1230hrs LZ Falcon Nov 14,1965

    Brown told me on the radio that he was dropping me at

    >Landing Zone Falcon five miles

    from LZ XRay and I would have to catch a ride in from there.

    More disappointment.

    I jumped off the chopper at another small clearing in the scrub brush,

    this one filled with a battery of 12 105mm howitzer artillery pieces.

    They were firing nonstop, providing support for Lt. Col. Moore’s besieged battalion in XRay.

    As the day wore on more reporters drifted in.

    A new AP guy I had >not previously met

    Someone from Reuters, >probably

    >A couple of others.

    >We met every chopper begging for a ride in to the fight.

    probably my friend? Not previously met? other Reporters? this dailog is from a reporter?

    some one from?,

    No luck.

    The day was growing older and except for the incessant din of outgoing artillery fire we were

    no closer to the action.

    It was then that I ran into Capt. Gregg (Matt) Dillon, the 1st Battalion S-3 or operations

    officer.

    I asked how I could get to XRay.

    He replied: I am going in with two choppers full of ammo and water just as soon as it is good

    dark.

    I said I wanted to go.

    He said he couldn’t make that decision without Hal Moore’s approval, but he would get on

    the radio and ask him.

    I stuck with him till he picked up the radio handset and informed Moore of his plans.

    “Oh yes, that reporter Galloway wants to come along.”

    Hal Moore responded: “If he is crazy enough to want to come in here, and you have the

    room, bring him along.”

    All right!

    I had a ride.

    Now all I had to do was hide out from the rest of the gang till they got tired and headed back

    to Pleiku for the night.

    I disappeared behind a tent and waited them out.

    Finally they were all gone and Dillon’s two choppers roared in. aprox 2030hrs-2100hrs

    We got aboard in the darkness and lifted off.

    I was bound for the biggest battle of the war—

    and I was all alone.

    An exclusive!

    Galloway met Jimmys wife BUT in 2 diffrent stories Joe Galloway writes

    Posted on Fri, Apr. 29, 2005,

    Joe Galloway His Wife Cathy?

    Joe Galloway his wife Trudy?

    http://www.realcities.com/mld/krwashington/news/special_packages/galloway/11525840.htm

    Saturday, Aug 27, 2005
    Joe Galloway

    Posted on Fri, Apr. 29, 2005

    There were men such as Jim Nakayama of Rigby, Idaho,

    who had so much to live for.

    >>His wife,

    >>Cathy,

    >>gave birth to their baby girl, Nikki,

    a couple of days >before

    Today, Vietnam is different from when the war started and ended

    By JOSEPH L. GALLOWAY

    Knight Ridder Newspapers

    HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam – Never mind that dateline. It will always be Saigon to me, the place where I landed 40 years ago to cover a war that would eventually consume much of my youth and much of my country’s innocence before it ended in bitter, bloody chaos three decades ago.

    The old familiar streets are still here, but now they’re lined with chic shops and boutiques instead of the seedy bars where delicate Vietnamese women once wheedled overpriced “Saigon Teas” out of big American GIs.

    The traffic is, at once, both denser and calmer as motorcycles have replaced bicycles and the man-powered cyclo taxis have been banned from the center of town. Pedestrians seem to risk death just crossing a street full of speeding motorbikes, but it’s a carefully choreographed dance. There are rules for the walker: Don’t run. Don’t try to dodge. Just walk slowly straight ahead and let the motorbikes adjust for you.

    The Vietnamese are still the hardest-working people I have ever known, hustling and bustling and chasing a buck and a living with determination. The majority of them, 60-plus percent, are under the age of 30, and for them the war is something in the history books.

    The country and the people are far different than they were when we came and when we left. In the cities, the old shabby yellow colonial buildings that survived have been spruced up and modernized. Office towers and high-rise hotels tower over their older neighbors. Cranes are everywhere in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City as new construction sprouts on every available scrap of land.

    Communists may still rule here, but business is still business, and business is good in Vietnam. The country’s economy grew at a rate of 7.7 percent in 2004.

    Two-way trade between Vietnam and the United States has reached $6 billion annually. Trade with neighboring China is also at $6 billion a year. A local Honda plant cranks out millions of the ubiquitous motorbikes that sell for the equivalent of $1,000 to $2,000.

    On the outskirts of Hanoi, a huge gate modeled after the Brandenburg in Berlin, complete with sculpted horses, marks the entrance of a new subdivision for the very affluent. A planned but still unbuilt house there sold six months ago for $250,000. The same non-existent home has already changed hands twice. The last buyer paid $450,000 for it.

    Yet in poorer rural areas such as Quang Tri province, the per capita income is still around $200.

    What we call the Vietnam War the Vietnamese call the American War. “You see, we have fought so many wars over a thousand years that we could never call yours `the Vietnam War’ – it would be meaningless to us,” explained an earnest young guide in Hanoi.

    The American War takes up only one paragraph in the history book taught in grade schools in Vietnam today. But a big, busy bookstore on what once was Tu Do Street in old Saigon carries shelves full of books about the war and biographies of some of the great North Vietnamese Army commanders, such as Gen. Nguyen Huu An, who did his best to kill all of us in the Ia Drang Valley during some terrible November days in 1965.

    A friend and fellow scribbler, Phil Caputo, inscribed a copy of his book “A Rumor of War” to me: “As an old French general once told another, `The war, old boy, is our youth – secret and uninterred.'” By then, in the late 1970s, both of us knew exactly what that old French general meant.

    It seemed so simple and straightforward when we began that march 40 years ago with the landing of the first American Marine battalion at the port city of Danang. We were a modern superpower blocking the spread of communism to a Third World country.

    War has a way of looking simple going in – and generally turns out to be far more complex and costly than the architects ever thought possible. This one sure was.

    The Vietnam War consumed the presidency of the brash Texan Lyndon B. Johnson, who sent the first combat troops there. It brought young American protesters into the streets and helped topple Johnson’s successor, Richard Nixon. A third president, Gerald Ford, inherited an orphaned war that ended in chaos and defeat on his watch.

    To those who fought it, mostly young draftees on both sides, the war was unavoidable, a duty their country demanded of them. To those caught in the middle, the peasant farm families, it was an unending and deadly disruption to their lives. One and a half million Vietnamese perished in those 10 years. On the black granite wall in Washington, D.C., the names of 58,249 Americans who died in Vietnam are engraved.

    The war gave me the best friends of my life and took some of them away almost immediately. I can still see their faces as they were then.

    There was Dickie Chapelle, with her horn-rimmed glasses and a boonie hat decorated with the jump wings she’d earned in some other war long before. She told me that the first rule of war corresponding was that you must survive in order to write the story and ship your film. A Marine walking in front of her set off a booby-trapped mortar shell and a tiny fragment nicked her carotid artery. She bled to death, her head in the lap of another reporter, Bob Poos, while a Catholic chaplain gave her the last rites.

    And Henri Huet, half French, half Vietnamese, all heart, all smiles. He took me on my first combat operation, teaching me every step of the way how to do this insane work and stay alive. He went down in a South Vietnamese Huey helicopter inside Laos in 1971 with the finest photographer of the war, Larry Burrows of Life magazine, and another who might have inherited Burrows’ mantle had he lived, Kent Potter of UPI.

    I think of them all, all 66 who died in our war giving everything they had, telling the truth and showing the real face of war to America and the world.

    I think, too, of the young American soldiers who died all around me in the Ia Drang Valley and elsewhere in a war that seemed like it would never end – and never really has in my memory and in my heart.

    >>There were men such as Jim Nakayama of Rigby, Idaho,

    >>who had so much to live for.

    >>His wife,

    >>Cathy,

    >>gave birth to their baby girl, Nikki,

    >>a couple of days before he died on Nov. 15, 1965.

    Then there were those on the other side, such as Gen. An who did his best to wipe us out in the Ia Drang and came damned close to it. Years later, in 1993, he and some of his officers went back to our old battlefield with us, walked that blood-stained ground and shed tears with us for all who died there, American and Vietnamese.

    Gen. An died of a heart attack a year later.

    In 1995 my good friend Lt. Gen. Hal Moore and I visited Gen. An’s home in Hanoi to pay our respects to his widow and children. There, in a glass case of his most precious possessions, along with his uniform and medals and photographs of the young warrior, was a copy of our book, “We Were Soldiers Once … and Young,” which told the story of the battle.

    I think, too, of Col. Vu Dinh Thuoc, who started his career as a private storming the French positions at Dienbienphu and progressed to lieutenant commanding a company at the Ia Drang and on to colonel commanding a division in the final attack on Saigon.

    As we later walked the battlefield together, Thuoc tapped me on the chest and said:

    “You have the heart of a soldier. It is the same as mine. I am glad I did not kill you.”

    So am I, colonel. So am I.

    And I am glad that peace and a measure of prosperity have at last come to Vietnam and its people after a thousand years of war. There’s no room left for anger or bitterness, only memories, and they, too, will vanish soon enough.

    ———————-

    Joseph L. Galloway is the senior military correspondent for Knight Ridder Newspapers. He spent 22 years as a foreign and war correspondent and bureau chief for United Press International, and nearly 20 years as a senior editor and senior writer for U.S. News & World Report magazine. His overseas postings included four tours as a war correspondent in Vietnam.

    On May 1, 1998, Galloway was decorated with the Bronze Star with V for valor for rescuing wounded soldiers under fire in the Ia Drang Valley in November 1965. His is the only medal of valor the U.S. Army awarded to a civilian for actions during the Vietnam War. He is the co-author, with retired Lt. Gen. Hal G. Moore, of the national bestseller “We Were Soldiers Once … and Young,” which was made into the movie “We Were Soldiers,” starring Mel Gibson.

    A Reporter’s Journal From Hell
    by Joe Galloway

    Part Four: A Season in Hell

    http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0204/galloway4.htm

    The two cans went right over our heads and impacted no more than 20 yards from us,

    the jellied gasoline spreading out and flaming up going away from us.

    That 20 yards saved our lives, but through the blazing fire I could see two men, two

    Americans, dancing in that fire.

    I jumped to my feet.

    I charged on in and someone was yelling, “Get this man’s feet!”

    I reached down and grabbed the ankles of a horribly burned soldier.

    They crumbled and the skin and flesh, now cooked, rubbed off.

    I could feel his bare ankle bones in the palms of my hands.

    >>We carried him to the aid station.

    >>Later I would learn that his name was Jimmy D. Nakayama of Rigby, Idaho.

    >>His wife >>Trudie

    >>November 7. ??

    >>Jimmy died in an Army hospital two days later, on November 17.

    >>For a lot of years I looked for Jimmy’s wife and daughter.

    >>Last month, after the movie We Were Soldiers was released I received a letter from

    >>Jimmy’s widow.

    >>Last week a letter came from his daughter Nikki, now 36 years old and the mother of

    >>two young sons.

    >>No single day has passed since that long-ago November day that I have not thought

    >>about Jimmy Nakayama,

    >>the young woman who loved him,

    >>and the daughter who would never know a father’s love.

    When Did Galloway meet Lt. Col. Moore, Sgt. Maj. Plumley?

    did Galloway load wounded when they landed on LZ Xray?

    Joe Galloway has boarded Moore’s, Plumley’s Huey’s on the morning of Nov 10,1965

    and they dont even know it.

    http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0204/galloway3.htm

    by Joe Galloway A Reporters Report from hell.

    Part Three: The Things We Carried…

    ref from the Digital Journalist, We Were Soldiers Once and Young hardback

    story 1
    Galloway meets Lt. Col. Moore, Sgt. Maj. Plumley the morning of the 11,1965 on a

    6,000ft mountain top 5 miles east of Plei Me.

    We Were Soldiers Once and Young hardback page32, paperback Mel Gibson on cover
    page 45-46
    Galloway meets Lt. Col. Moore, Sgt. Maj. Plumley the morning of the 11,1965 on a

    6,000ft mountain top 5 miles east of Plei Me.

    from Soldier of Fortune Sept.,1983,page 27 3rd paragraph far right column

    11 Nov 1965 morning.
    >Galloway meets >only Moore

    Galloway “Moore walked over and suggested that if I were attached to them I could dam

    well shave too.

    from Soldier of Fortune Sept.,1983,page 27 3rd paragraph far right column
    story 2
    Galloway meets Plumley aprox 2130hrs on Nov 14,1965 on LZ X-Ray.

    from the Digital Journalist

    Question How did Galloway get past LT.Col. Moore as they loaded the Hueys as each

    person must be accounted for, before lift off.

    Galloway “On November 10th the 3rd Brigade of the 1st Cavalry Division moved into the

    field to continue operations around Plei Me Camp”.

    I hooked up with the 1st Battalion 7th U.S. Cavalry which was lifting by helicopter into a

    remote area of the Special Forces Camp, searching for the North Vietnamese who

    had fled.

    I had my new M-16 rifle on my shoulder, 20 full magazines in my pack.

    I also carried these things:

    two full canteens on a pistol belt.

    A sheathed bayonet.

    Two Nikon F cameras on my shoulder and around my neck.

    I had a 35mm lens on one, a 43-86mm zoom lens on the other.

    My pack contained the magazines for the rifle.

    Clean socks and drawers.

    Shaving gear.

    A dozen rolls of Ektachrome color; a couple of bricks of Kodak Tri X black and white.

    C-rations for a couple of days.

    A bottle of Louisiana hot sauce to make them semi-palatable.

    Half a dozen small reporter notebooks.

    Couple of spare pens.

    Two books—Bernard Fall’s Street Without Joy, and T.R. Fehrenbach’s This Kind of War.

    A fist-sized lump of C-4 plastic explosive, about which more later.

    Strapped beneath my pack was a nylon poncho liner rolled inside an Army rubber

    coated poncho; on its side an entrenching tool.

    We heli-lifted into an old cassava field, hacked and burned out of the jungle.

    Question How did Galloway get past Col. moore when they loaded the Hueys as each

    person must be accounted for, befor lift off.

    11 Nov 1965 morning.
    >Galloway meets Moore and Plumley for the first time?

    I was fishing around for a couple of packets of instant coffee when the battalion

    commander,

    Lt. Col. Hal Moore, and his sergeant-major, Basil L. Plumley, loomed up.

    The colonel welcomed me to his battalion, inspecting me closely all the while.

    Finally he said these words: In my battalion, everyone shaves in the morning.

    You, too.

    He was looking at my cup of coffee water.

    The sergeant major was grinning broadly.

    I groaned and dug out my razor and bar of soap.

    2. Soldier of Fortune 1983 Sept If You Want a Good Fight by Joe Galloway

    page 27 3rd paragraph far right column

    Galloway dosent meet Plumley till 2130hrs! Nov 14th1965 on X-Ray

    Galloway ” A gruff voice came out of the dark as Dillion and I stood up.

    “Watch out where you walk.

    There are a lot of dead bodies around and they are all American”

    That was my> INTRODUCTION Sun, Mar. 03, 2002March 2002>> Joe Galloway”‘Clark died and, two days later”.

    Harold G. Moore, then the 1st Battalion commander,

    didn’t learn about Galloway’s actions until the two collaborated

    on “We Were Soldiers Once . . . And Young,”

    a best-selling book about the history of the battle published in 1992.

    Moore, who retired as a three-star general, put Galloway in for the award.

    Moore’s big LIE

    “There was grazing machine-gun fire going over our heads and he got up in that grazing fire

    and ran to that soldier to save him,” Moore said.

    Galloway, crouching down to avoid enemy fire, saw PFC Jimmy Nakayama and Spc.5

    James Clark get caught by the flames.

    With the help of Sgt. George Nye, Galloway grabbed Nakayama’s feet and carried him to

    safety.

    >Clark died

    Thursday, Jun. 4, 1998

    Refugio native awarded Bronze Star

    Former UPI reporter tried to save a wounded soldier during the Vietnam War

    By STEPHANIE L. JORDAN
    Staff Writer

    BAYSIDE — For Refugio native Joe Galloway, reporting the Vietnam War meant getting away from press briefings, safe base camps and clean sheets. He saw the war as the grunts saw it, down in the dirt with the heat, death, blood, fear and valor.
    And on Nov. 15, 1965, during the first large-scale battle between American troops and the North Vietnamese Army, Galloway stopped being a United Press International reporter and became a hero.

    On May 1, 1998, Galloway — now a senior writer for U.S. News and World Report — was awarded a Bronze Star with a “V” device for valor for his actions during the battle. Galloway, who divides his time between homes in Bayside and Boston, is the first civilian to be given the award from the Army, said Maj. Gen. Joseph K. Kellogg, who presented him with the medal at Fort Bragg, N.C.

    “At that time and that place he was a soldier,” Kellogg said. “He was a soldier in spirit, he was a soldier in actions and he was a soldier in deeds.”

    Galloway was honored for trying to save a wounded soldier during one of the pivotal battles of the Vietnam War, a battle that left 234 Americans dead.

    “I know that wasn’t my job, but in those days everyone did what they could to survive and help everyone else make it out of there alive,” Galloway said.

    While with troops of the 7th Cavalry’s 1st Battalion — part of the First Cavalry Division — fighting in the Central Highlands, Galloway was in the battalion command post when an

    American fighter mistakenly dropped napalm near the position.

    Galloway, crouching down to avoid enemy fire, saw PFC Jimmy Nakayama and Spc.5 James

    Clark get caught by the flames.

    With the help of Sgt. George Nye, Galloway grabbed Nakayama’s feet and carried him to

    safety.

    ———-Joe Galloway

    >>> “Clark died > Thursday, Sep 01, 2005They Were Soldiers
    The requested article was not found.

    http://www.scottmanning.com/archives/000431.php

    Joe Galloway in 2 diffrent places at the same time 1700hrs

    Nov.14,1965 40k apart places, 1st Catecha, 2nd LZ Falcon

    http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0204/galloway3.htm

    A Reporter’s Journal From Hell
    by Joe Galloway

    Part Three: The Things We Carried…

    CATECHA
    In the morning the word passed that B Company was moving out; the whole battalion was moving out on an operation to the west of Plei Me Camp. I caught up with the Brigade Commander, Col. Tim Brown, who confirmed that for me.

    I told him I wanted to ride in with the 1st Battalion.

    Brown said it was probably going to be another long, hot walk in the sun—but I could hang around and if anything happened he would fly out in his command helicopter and I could go with him.

    I nodded but had a bad feeling about this; felt I ought to go in with the troops.

    The 1st Battalion troops lifted on out,

    replaced by Bravo Company, 2nd Battalion 7th Cav.

    1700hrs Nov 14th 1965 Catecha
    Later, when the radios burst into frenzied reports of action, Bravo 2/7 Cav began lining up

    and loading up on choppers.

    Galloway
    I slipped down the line, found one chopper with room and got

    aboard.

    Just before we lifted off a big lieutenant came down the line

    looking in every chopper.

    He spotted me, waved me off, and put a medic aboard in my seat.

    I couldn’t complain about that, but there was action out there in a place designated Landing

    Zone XRay, and I couldn’t get there.

    Back to Brigade HQ. Col. Brown came bustling out of the tent with a couple of his staff

    officers behind him.

    He waved me along, moving quickly toward his command chopper, bristling all over with radio

    antennas.

    He told me that Lt. Col. Moore and his men had gotten into a helluva fight out there in the Ia

    Drang Valley and he was headed there.

    1200hrs Nov 14th,1965 LZ XRay 1200hrs
    > As we neared the end of the 20 mile flight we could easily locate the battlefield: cloud of

    smoke rose high above it.

    We dropped down to about 1500 feet circling the clearing below.

    I had earphones on and could hear Col. Brown talking to Lt. Col. Moore. Brown wanted to

    land; Moore was telling him the landing zone was under intense enemy fire and if he landed

    that command chopper with all those antennas it would be a magnet for bullets.

    Moore succeeded in waving off his boss.

    aprox 1230hrs LZ Falcon Nov 14,1965

    Brown told me on the radio that he was dropping me at

    >Landing Zone Falcon five miles

    from LZ XRay and I would have to catch a ride in from there.

    More disappointment.

    I jumped off the chopper at another small clearing in the scrub brush,

    this one filled with a battery of 12 105mm howitzer artillery pieces.

    They were firing nonstop, providing support for Lt. Col. Moore’s besieged battalion in XRay.

    As the day wore on more reporters drifted in.

    A new AP guy I had >not previously met

    Someone from Reuters, >probably

    >A couple of others.

    >We met every chopper begging for a ride in to the fight.

    probably my friend? Not previously met? other Reporters? this dailog is from a reporter?

    some one from?,

    No luck.

    The day was growing older and except for the incessant din of outgoing artillery fire we were

    no closer to the action.

    It was then that I ran into Capt. Gregg (Matt) Dillon, the 1st Battalion S-3 or operations

    officer.

    I asked how I could get to XRay.

    He replied: I am going in with two choppers full of ammo and water just as soon as it is good

    dark.

    I said I wanted to go.

    He said he couldn’t make that decision without Hal Moore’s approval, but he would get on

    the radio and ask him.

    I stuck with him till he picked up the radio handset and informed Moore of his plans.

    “Oh yes, that reporter Galloway wants to come along.”

    Hal Moore responded: “If he is crazy enough to want to come in here, and you have the

    room, bring him along.”

    All right!

    I had a ride.

    Now all I had to do was hide out from the rest of the gang till they got tired and headed back

    to Pleiku for the night.

    I disappeared behind a tent and waited them out.

    Finally they were all gone and Dillon’s two choppers roared in. aprox 2030hrs-2100hrs

    We got aboard in the darkness and lifted off.

    I was bound for the biggest battle of the war—

    and I was all alone.

    An exclusive!

    Galloway met Jimmys wife BUT in 2 diffrent stories Joe Galloway writes

    Posted on Fri, Apr. 29, 2005,

    Joe Galloway His Wife Cathy?

    Joe Galloway his wife Trudy?

    http://www.realcities.com/mld/krwashington/news/special_packages/galloway/11525840.htm

    Saturday, Aug 27, 2005
    Joe Galloway

    Posted on Fri, Apr. 29, 2005

    There were men such as Jim Nakayama of Rigby, Idaho,

    who had so much to live for.

    >>His wife,

    >>Cathy,

    >>gave birth to their baby girl, Nikki,

    a couple of days >before

    Today, Vietnam is different from when the war started and ended

    By JOSEPH L. GALLOWAY

    Knight Ridder Newspapers

    HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam – Never mind that dateline. It will always be Saigon to me, the place where I landed 40 years ago to cover a war that would eventually consume much of my youth and much of my country’s innocence before it ended in bitter, bloody chaos three decades ago.

    The old familiar streets are still here, but now they’re lined with chic shops and boutiques instead of the seedy bars where delicate Vietnamese women once wheedled overpriced “Saigon Teas” out of big American GIs.

    The traffic is, at once, both denser and calmer as motorcycles have replaced bicycles and the man-powered cyclo taxis have been banned from the center of town. Pedestrians seem to risk death just crossing a street full of speeding motorbikes, but it’s a carefully choreographed dance. There are rules for the walker: Don’t run. Don’t try to dodge. Just walk slowly straight ahead and let the motorbikes adjust for you.

    The Vietnamese are still the hardest-working people I have ever known, hustling and bustling and chasing a buck and a living with determination. The majority of them, 60-plus percent, are under the age of 30, and for them the war is something in the history books.

    The country and the people are far different than they were when we came and when we left. In the cities, the old shabby yellow colonial buildings that survived have been spruced up and modernized. Office towers and high-rise hotels tower over their older neighbors. Cranes are everywhere in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City as new construction sprouts on every available scrap of land.

    Communists may still rule here, but business is still business, and business is good in Vietnam. The country’s economy grew at a rate of 7.7 percent in 2004.

    Two-way trade between Vietnam and the United States has reached $6 billion annually. Trade with neighboring China is also at $6 billion a year. A local Honda plant cranks out millions of the ubiquitous motorbikes that sell for the equivalent of $1,000 to $2,000.

    On the outskirts of Hanoi, a huge gate modeled after the Brandenburg in Berlin, complete with sculpted horses, marks the entrance of a new subdivision for the very affluent. A planned but still unbuilt house there sold six months ago for $250,000. The same non-existent home has already changed hands twice. The last buyer paid $450,000 for it.

    Yet in poorer rural areas such as Quang Tri province, the per capita income is still around $200.

    What we call the Vietnam War the Vietnamese call the American War. “You see, we have fought so many wars over a thousand years that we could never call yours `the Vietnam War’ – it would be meaningless to us,” explained an earnest young guide in Hanoi.

    The American War takes up only one paragraph in the history book taught in grade schools in Vietnam today. But a big, busy bookstore on what once was Tu Do Street in old Saigon carries shelves full of books about the war and biographies of some of the great North Vietnamese Army commanders, such as Gen. Nguyen Huu An, who did his best to kill all of us in the Ia Drang Valley during some terrible November days in 1965.

    A friend and fellow scribbler, Phil Caputo, inscribed a copy of his book “A Rumor of War” to me: “As an old French general once told another, `The war, old boy, is our youth – secret and uninterred.'” By then, in the late 1970s, both of us knew exactly what that old French general meant.

    It seemed so simple and straightforward when we began that march 40 years ago with the landing of the first American Marine battalion at the port city of Danang. We were a modern superpower blocking the spread of communism to a Third World country.

    War has a way of looking simple going in – and generally turns out to be far more complex and costly than the architects ever thought possible. This one sure was.

    The Vietnam War consumed the presidency of the brash Texan Lyndon B. Johnson, who sent the first combat troops there. It brought young American protesters into the streets and helped topple Johnson’s successor, Richard Nixon. A third president, Gerald Ford, inherited an orphaned war that ended in chaos and defeat on his watch.

    To those who fought it, mostly young draftees on both sides, the war was unavoidable, a duty their country demanded of them. To those caught in the middle, the peasant farm families, it was an unending and deadly disruption to their lives. One and a half million Vietnamese perished in those 10 years. On the black granite wall in Washington, D.C., the names of 58,249 Americans who died in Vietnam are engraved.

    The war gave me the best friends of my life and took some of them away almost immediately. I can still see their faces as they were then.

    There was Dickie Chapelle, with her horn-rimmed glasses and a boonie hat decorated with the jump wings she’d earned in some other war long before. She told me that the first rule of war corresponding was that you must survive in order to write the story and ship your film. A Marine walking in front of her set off a booby-trapped mortar shell and a tiny fragment nicked her carotid artery. She bled to death, her head in the lap of another reporter, Bob Poos, while a Catholic chaplain gave her the last rites.

    And Henri Huet, half French, half Vietnamese, all heart, all smiles. He took me on my first combat operation, teaching me every step of the way how to do this insane work and stay alive. He went down in a South Vietnamese Huey helicopter inside Laos in 1971 with the finest photographer of the war, Larry Burrows of Life magazine, and another who might have inherited Burrows’ mantle had he lived, Kent Potter of UPI.

    I think of them all, all 66 who died in our war giving everything they had, telling the truth and showing the real face of war to America and the world.

    I think, too, of the young American soldiers who died all around me in the Ia Drang Valley and elsewhere in a war that seemed like it would never end – and never really has in my memory and in my heart.

    >>There were men such as Jim Nakayama of Rigby, Idaho,

    >>who had so much to live for.

    >>His wife,

    >>Cathy,

    >>gave birth to their baby girl, Nikki,

    >>a couple of days before he died on Nov. 15, 1965.

    Then there were those on the other side, such as Gen. An who did his best to wipe us out in the Ia Drang and came damned close to it. Years later, in 1993, he and some of his officers went back to our old battlefield with us, walked that blood-stained ground and shed tears with us for all who died there, American and Vietnamese.

    Gen. An died of a heart attack a year later.

    In 1995 my good friend Lt. Gen. Hal Moore and I visited Gen. An’s home in Hanoi to pay our respects to his widow and children. There, in a glass case of his most precious possessions, along with his uniform and medals and photographs of the young warrior, was a copy of our book, “We Were Soldiers Once … and Young,” which told the story of the battle.

    I think, too, of Col. Vu Dinh Thuoc, who started his career as a private storming the French positions at Dienbienphu and progressed to lieutenant commanding a company at the Ia Drang and on to colonel commanding a division in the final attack on Saigon.

    As we later walked the battlefield together, Thuoc tapped me on the chest and said:

    “You have the heart of a soldier. It is the same as mine. I am glad I did not kill you.”

    So am I, colonel. So am I.

    And I am glad that peace and a measure of prosperity have at last come to Vietnam and its people after a thousand years of war. There’s no room left for anger or bitterness, only memories, and they, too, will vanish soon enough.

    ———————-

    Joseph L. Galloway is the senior military correspondent for Knight Ridder Newspapers. He spent 22 years as a foreign and war correspondent and bureau chief for United Press International, and nearly 20 years as a senior editor and senior writer for U.S. News & World Report magazine. His overseas postings included four tours as a war correspondent in Vietnam.

    On May 1, 1998, Galloway was decorated with the Bronze Star with V for valor for rescuing wounded soldiers under fire in the Ia Drang Valley in November 1965. His is the only medal of valor the U.S. Army awarded to a civilian for actions during the Vietnam War. He is the co-author, with retired Lt. Gen. Hal G. Moore, of the national bestseller “We Were Soldiers Once … and Young,” which was made into the movie “We Were Soldiers,” starring Mel Gibson.

    A Reporter’s Journal From Hell
    by Joe Galloway

    Part Four: A Season in Hell

    http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0204/galloway4.htm

    The two cans went right over our heads and impacted no more than 20 yards from us,

    the jellied gasoline spreading out and flaming up going away from us.

    That 20 yards saved our lives, but through the blazing fire I could see two men, two

    Americans, dancing in that fire.

    I jumped to my feet.

    I charged on in and someone was yelling, “Get this man’s feet!”

    I reached down and grabbed the ankles of a horribly burned soldier.

    They crumbled and the skin and flesh, now cooked, rubbed off.

    I could feel his bare ankle bones in the palms of my hands.

    >>We carried him to the aid station.

    >>Later I would learn that his name was Jimmy D. Nakayama of Rigby, Idaho.

    >>His wife >>Trudie

    >>November 7. ??

    >>Jimmy died in an Army hospital two days later, on November 17.

    >>For a lot of years I looked for Jimmy’s wife and daughter.

    >>Last month, after the movie We Were Soldiers was released I received a letter from

    >>Jimmy’s widow.

    >>Last week a letter came from his daughter Nikki, now 36 years old and the mother of

    >>two young sons.

    >>No single day has passed since that long-ago November day that I have not thought

    >>about Jimmy Nakayama,

    >>the young woman who loved him,

    >>and the daughter who would never know a father’s love.

    When Did Galloway meet Lt. Col. Moore, Sgt. Maj. Plumley?

    did Galloway load wounded when they landed on LZ Xray?

    Joe Galloway has boarded Moore’s, Plumley’s Huey’s on the morning of Nov 10,1965

    and they dont even know it.

    http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0204/galloway3.htm

    by Joe Galloway A Reporters Report from hell.

    Part Three: The Things We Carried…

    ref from the Digital Journalist, We Were Soldiers Once and Young hardback

    story 1
    Galloway meets Lt. Col. Moore, Sgt. Maj. Plumley the morning of the 11,1965 on a

    6,000ft mountain top 5 miles east of Plei Me.

    We Were Soldiers Once and Young hardback page32, paperback Mel Gibson on cover
    page 45-46
    Galloway meets Lt. Col. Moore, Sgt. Maj. Plumley the morning of the 11,1965 on a

    6,000ft mountain top 5 miles east of Plei Me.

    from Soldier of Fortune Sept.,1983,page 27 3rd paragraph far right column

    11 Nov 1965 morning.
    >Galloway meets >only Moore

    Galloway “Moore walked over and suggested that if I were attached to them I could dam

    well shave too.

    from Soldier of Fortune Sept.,1983,page 27 3rd paragraph far right column
    story 2
    Galloway meets Plumley aprox 2130hrs on Nov 14,1965 on LZ X-Ray.

    from the Digital Journalist

    Question How did Galloway get past LT.Col. Moore as they loaded the Hueys as each

    person must be accounted for, before lift off.

    Galloway “On November 10th the 3rd Brigade of the 1st Cavalry Division moved into the

    field to continue operations around Plei Me Camp”.

    I hooked up with the 1st Battalion 7th U.S. Cavalry which was lifting by helicopter into a

    remote area of the Special Forces Camp, searching for the North Vietnamese who

    had fled.

    I had my new M-16 rifle on my shoulder, 20 full magazines in my pack.

    I also carried these things:

    two full canteens on a pistol belt.

    A sheathed bayonet.

    Two Nikon F cameras on my shoulder and around my neck.

    I had a 35mm lens on one, a 43-86mm zoom lens on the other.

    My pack contained the magazines for the rifle.

    Clean socks and drawers.

    Shaving gear.

    A dozen rolls of Ektachrome color; a couple of bricks of Kodak Tri X black and white.

    C-rations for a couple of days.

    A bottle of Louisiana hot sauce to make them semi-palatable.

    Half a dozen small reporter notebooks.

    Couple of spare pens.

    Two books—Bernard Fall’s Street Without Joy, and T.R. Fehrenbach’s This Kind of War.

    A fist-sized lump of C-4 plastic explosive, about which more later.

    Strapped beneath my pack was a nylon poncho liner rolled inside an Army rubber

    coated poncho; on its side an entrenching tool.

    We heli-lifted into an old cassava field, hacked and burned out of the jungle.

    Question How did Galloway get past Col. moore when they loaded the Hueys as each

    person must be accounted for, befor lift off.

    11 Nov 1965 morning.
    >Galloway meets Moore and Plumley for the first time?

    I was fishing around for a couple of packets of instant coffee when the battalion

    commander,

    Lt. Col. Hal Moore, and his sergeant-major, Basil L. Plumley, loomed up.

    The colonel welcomed me to his battalion, inspecting me closely all the while.

    Finally he said these words: In my battalion, everyone shaves in the morning.

    You, too.

    He was looking at my cup of coffee water.

    The sergeant major was grinning broadly.

    I groaned and dug out my razor and bar of soap.

    2. Soldier of Fortune 1983 Sept If You Want a Good Fight by Joe Galloway

    page 27 3rd paragraph far right column

    Galloway dosent meet Plumley till 2130hrs! Nov 14th1965 on X-Ray

    Galloway ” A gruff voice came out of the dark as Dillion and I stood up.

    “Watch out where you walk.

    There are a lot of dead bodies around and they are all American”

    That was my> INTRODUCTION Sun, Mar. 03, 2002March 2002>> Joe Galloway”‘Clark died and, two days later”.

    Harold G. Moore, then the 1st Battalion commander,

    didn’t learn about Galloway’s actions until the two collaborated

    on “We Were Soldiers Once . . . And Young,”

    a best-selling book about the history of the battle published in 1992.

    Moore, who retired as a three-star general, put Galloway in for the award.

    Moore’s big LIE

    “There was grazing machine-gun fire going over our heads and he got up in that grazing fire

    and ran to that soldier to save him,” Moore said.

    Galloway, crouching down to avoid enemy fire, saw PFC Jimmy Nakayama and Spc.5

    James Clark get caught by the flames.

    With the help of Sgt. George Nye, Galloway grabbed Nakayama’s feet and carried him to

    safety.

    >Clark died

    Thursday, Jun. 4, 1998

    Refugio native awarded Bronze Star

    Former UPI reporter tried to save a wounded soldier during the Vietnam War

    By STEPHANIE L. JORDAN
    Staff Writer

    BAYSIDE — For Refugio native Joe Galloway, reporting the Vietnam War meant getting away from press briefings, safe base camps and clean sheets. He saw the war as the grunts saw it, down in the dirt with the heat, death, blood, fear and valor.
    And on Nov. 15, 1965, during the first large-scale battle between American troops and the North Vietnamese Army, Galloway stopped being a United Press International reporter and became a hero.

    On May 1, 1998, Galloway — now a senior writer for U.S. News and World Report — was awarded a Bronze Star with a “V” device for valor for his actions during the battle. Galloway, who divides his time between homes in Bayside and Boston, is the first civilian to be given the award from the Army, said Maj. Gen. Joseph K. Kellogg, who presented him with the medal at Fort Bragg, N.C.

    “At that time and that place he was a soldier,” Kellogg said. “He was a soldier in spirit, he was a soldier in actions and he was a soldier in deeds.”

    Galloway was honored for trying to save a wounded soldier during one of the pivotal battles of the Vietnam War, a battle that left 234 Americans dead.

    “I know that wasn’t my job, but in those days everyone did what they could to survive and help everyone else make it out of there alive,” Galloway said.

    While with troops of the 7th Cavalry’s 1st Battalion — part of the First Cavalry Division — fighting in the Central Highlands, Galloway was in the battalion command post when an

    American fighter mistakenly dropped napalm near the position.

    Galloway, crouching down to avoid enemy fire, saw PFC Jimmy Nakayama and Spc.5 James

    Clark get caught by the flames.

    With the help of Sgt. George Nye, Galloway grabbed Nakayama’s feet and carried him to

    safety.

    ———-Joe Galloway

    >>> “Clark died > Thursday, Sep 01, 2005They Were Soldiers
    The requested article was not found.

    http://www.scottmanning.com/archives/000431.php

    Joe Galloway in 2 diffrent places at the same time 1700hrs

    Nov.14,1965 40k apart places, 1st Catecha, 2nd LZ Falcon

    http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0204/galloway3.htm

    A Reporter’s Journal From Hell
    by Joe Galloway

    Part Three: The Things We Carried…

    CATECHA
    In the morning the word passed that B Company was moving out; the whole battalion was moving out on an operation to the west of Plei Me Camp. I caught up with the Brigade Commander, Col. Tim Brown, who confirmed that for me.

    I told him I wanted to ride in with the 1st Battalion.

    Brown said it was probably going to be another long, hot walk in the sun—but I could hang around and if anything happened he would fly out in his command helicopter and I could go with him.

    I nodded but had a bad feeling about this; felt I ought to go in with the troops.

    The 1st Battalion troops lifted on out,

    replaced by Bravo Company, 2nd Battalion 7th Cav.

    1700hrs Nov 14th 1965 Catecha
    Later, when the radios burst into frenzied reports of action, Bravo 2/7 Cav began lining up

    and loading up on choppers.

    Galloway
    I slipped down the line, found one chopper with room and got

    aboard.

    Just before we lifted off a big lieutenant came down the line

    looking in every chopper.

    He spotted me, waved me off, and put a medic aboard in my seat.

    I couldn’t complain about that, but there was action out there in a place designated Landing

    Zone XRay, and I couldn’t get there.

    Back to Brigade HQ. Col. Brown came bustling out of the tent with a couple of his staff

    officers behind him.

    He waved me along, moving quickly toward his command chopper, bristling all over with radio

    antennas.

    He told me that Lt. Col. Moore and his men had gotten into a helluva fight out there in the Ia

    Drang Valley and he was headed there.

    1200hrs Nov 14th,1965 LZ XRay 1200hrs
    > As we neared the end of the 20 mile flight we could easily locate the battlefield: cloud of

    smoke rose high above it.

    We dropped down to about 1500 feet circling the clearing below.

    I had earphones on and could hear Col. Brown talking to Lt. Col. Moore. Brown wanted to

    land; Moore was telling him the landing zone was under intense enemy fire and if he landed

    that command chopper with all those antennas it would be a magnet for bullets.

    Moore succeeded in waving off his boss.

    aprox 1230hrs LZ Falcon Nov 14,1965

    Brown told me on the radio that he was dropping me at

    >Landing Zone Falcon five miles

    from LZ XRay and I would have to catch a ride in from there.

    More disappointment.

    I jumped off the chopper at another small clearing in the scrub brush,

    this one filled with a battery of 12 105mm howitzer artillery pieces.

    They were firing nonstop, providing support for Lt. Col. Moore’s besieged battalion in XRay.

    As the day wore on more reporters drifted in.

    A new AP guy I had >not previously met

    Someone from Reuters, >probably

    >A couple of others.

    >We met every chopper begging for a ride in to the fight.

    probably my friend? Not previously met? other Reporters? this dailog is from a reporter?

    some one from?,

    No luck.

    The day was growing older and except for the incessant din of outgoing artillery fire we were

    no closer to the action.

    It was then that I ran into Capt. Gregg (Matt) Dillon, the 1st Battalion S-3 or operations

    officer.

    I asked how I could get to XRay.

    He replied: I am going in with two choppers full of ammo and water just as soon as it is good

    dark.

    I said I wanted to go.

    He said he couldn’t make that decision without Hal Moore’s approval, but he would get on

    the radio and ask him.

    I stuck with him till he picked up the radio handset and informed Moore of his plans.

    “Oh yes, that reporter Galloway wants to come along.”

    Hal Moore responded: “If he is crazy enough to want to come in here, and you have the

    room, bring him along.”

    All right!

    I had a ride.

    Now all I had to do was hide out from the rest of the gang till they got tired and headed back

    to Pleiku for the night.

    I disappeared behind a tent and waited them out.

    Finally they were all gone and Dillon’s two choppers roared in. aprox 2030hrs-2100hrs

    We got aboard in the darkness and lifted off.

    I was bound for the biggest battle of the war—

    and I was all alone.

    An exclusive!

    Galloway met Jimmys wife BUT in 2 diffrent stories Joe Galloway writes

    Posted on Fri, Apr. 29, 2005,

    Joe Galloway His Wife Cathy?

    Joe Galloway his wife Trudy?

    http://www.realcities.com/mld/krwashington/news/special_packages/galloway/11525840.htm

    Saturday, Aug 27, 2005
    Joe Galloway

    Posted on Fri, Apr. 29, 2005

    There were men such as Jim Nakayama of Rigby, Idaho,

    who had so much to live for.

    >>His wife,

    >>Cathy,

    >>gave birth to their baby girl, Nikki,

    a couple of days >before

    Today, Vietnam is different from when the war started and ended

    By JOSEPH L. GALLOWAY

    Knight Ridder Newspapers

    HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam – Never mind that dateline. It will always be Saigon to me, the place where I landed 40 years ago to cover a war that would eventually consume much of my youth and much of my country’s innocence before it ended in bitter, bloody chaos three decades ago.

    The old familiar streets are still here, but now they’re lined with chic shops and boutiques instead of the seedy bars where delicate Vietnamese women once wheedled overpriced “Saigon Teas” out of big American GIs.

    The traffic is, at once, both denser and calmer as motorcycles have replaced bicycles and the man-powered cyclo taxis have been banned from the center of town. Pedestrians seem to risk death just crossing a street full of speeding motorbikes, but it’s a carefully choreographed dance. There are rules for the walker: Don’t run. Don’t try to dodge. Just walk slowly straight ahead and let the motorbikes adjust for you.

    The Vietnamese are still the hardest-working people I have ever known, hustling and bustling and chasing a buck and a living with determination. The majority of them, 60-plus percent, are under the age of 30, and for them the war is something in the history books.

    The country and the people are far different than they were when we came and when we left. In the cities, the old shabby yellow colonial buildings that survived have been spruced up and modernized. Office towers and high-rise hotels tower over their older neighbors. Cranes are everywhere in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City as new construction sprouts on every available scrap of land.

    Communists may still rule here, but business is still business, and business is good in Vietnam. The country’s economy grew at a rate of 7.7 percent in 2004.

    Two-way trade between Vietnam and the United States has reached $6 billion annually. Trade with neighboring China is also at $6 billion a year. A local Honda plant cranks out millions of the ubiquitous motorbikes that sell for the equivalent of $1,000 to $2,000.

    On the outskirts of Hanoi, a huge gate modeled after the Brandenburg in Berlin, complete with sculpted horses, marks the entrance of a new subdivision for the very affluent. A planned but still unbuilt house there sold six months ago for $250,000. The same non-existent home has already changed hands twice. The last buyer paid $450,000 for it.

    Yet in poorer rural areas such as Quang Tri province, the per capita income is still around $200.

    What we call the Vietnam War the Vietnamese call the American War. “You see, we have fought so many wars over a thousand years that we could never call yours `the Vietnam War’ – it would be meaningless to us,” explained an earnest young guide in Hanoi.

    The American War takes up only one paragraph in the history book taught in grade schools in Vietnam today. But a big, busy bookstore on what once was Tu Do Street in old Saigon carries shelves full of books about the war and biographies of some of the great North Vietnamese Army commanders, such as Gen. Nguyen Huu An, who did his best to kill all of us in the Ia Drang Valley during some terrible November days in 1965.

    A friend and fellow scribbler, Phil Caputo, inscribed a copy of his book “A Rumor of War” to me: “As an old French general once told another, `The war, old boy, is our youth – secret and uninterred.'” By then, in the late 1970s, both of us knew exactly what that old French general meant.

    It seemed so simple and straightforward when we began that march 40 years ago with the landing of the first American Marine battalion at the port city of Danang. We were a modern superpower blocking the spread of communism to a Third World country.

    War has a way of looking simple going in – and generally turns out to be far more complex and costly than the architects ever thought possible. This one sure was.

    The Vietnam War consumed the presidency of the brash Texan Lyndon B. Johnson, who sent the first combat troops there. It brought young American protesters into the streets and helped topple Johnson’s successor, Richard Nixon. A third president, Gerald Ford, inherited an orphaned war that ended in chaos and defeat on his watch.

    To those who fought it, mostly young draftees on both sides, the war was unavoidable, a duty their country demanded of them. To those caught in the middle, the peasant farm families, it was an unending and deadly disruption to their lives. One and a half million Vietnamese perished in those 10 years. On the black granite wall in Washington, D.C., the names of 58,249 Americans who died in Vietnam are engraved.

    The war gave me the best friends of my life and took some of them away almost immediately. I can still see their faces as they were then.

    There was Dickie Chapelle, with her horn-rimmed glasses and a boonie hat decorated with the jump wings she’d earned in some other war long before. She told me that the first rule of war corresponding was that you must survive in order to write the story and ship your film. A Marine walking in front of her set off a booby-trapped mortar shell and a tiny fragment nicked her carotid artery. She bled to death, her head in the lap of another reporter, Bob Poos, while a Catholic chaplain gave her the last rites.

    And Henri Huet, half French, half Vietnamese, all heart, all smiles. He took me on my first combat operation, teaching me every step of the way how to do this insane work and stay alive. He went down in a South Vietnamese Huey helicopter inside Laos in 1971 with the finest photographer of the war, Larry Burrows of Life magazine, and another who might have inherited Burrows’ mantle had he lived, Kent Potter of UPI.

    I think of them all, all 66 who died in our war giving everything they had, telling the truth and showing the real face of war to America and the world.

    I think, too, of the young American soldiers who died all around me in the Ia Drang Valley and elsewhere in a war that seemed like it would never end – and never really has in my memory and in my heart.

    >>There were men such as Jim Nakayama of Rigby, Idaho,

    >>who had so much to live for.

    >>His wife,

    >>Cathy,

    >>gave birth to their baby girl, Nikki,

    >>a couple of days before he died on Nov. 15, 1965.

    Then there were those on the other side, such as Gen. An who did his best to wipe us out in the Ia Drang and came damned close to it. Years later, in 1993, he and some of his officers went back to our old battlefield with us, walked that blood-stained ground and shed tears with us for all who died there, American and Vietnamese.

    Gen. An died of a heart attack a year later.

    In 1995 my good friend Lt. Gen. Hal Moore and I visited Gen. An’s home in Hanoi to pay our respects to his widow and children. There, in a glass case of his most precious possessions, along with his uniform and medals and photographs of the young warrior, was a copy of our book, “We Were Soldiers Once … and Young,” which told the story of the battle.

    I think, too, of Col. Vu Dinh Thuoc, who started his career as a private storming the French positions at Dienbienphu and progressed to lieutenant commanding a company at the Ia Drang and on to colonel commanding a division in the final attack on Saigon.

    As we later walked the battlefield together, Thuoc tapped me on the chest and said:

    “You have the heart of a soldier. It is the same as mine. I am glad I did not kill you.”

    So am I, colonel. So am I.

    And I am glad that peace and a measure of prosperity have at last come to Vietnam and its people after a thousand years of war. There’s no room left for anger or bitterness, only memories, and they, too, will vanish soon enough.

    ———————-

    Joseph L. Galloway is the senior military correspondent for Knight Ridder Newspapers. He spent 22 years as a foreign and war correspondent and bureau chief for United Press International, and nearly 20 years as a senior editor and senior writer for U.S. News & World Report magazine. His overseas postings included four tours as a war correspondent in Vietnam.

    On May 1, 1998, Galloway was decorated with the Bronze Star with V for valor for rescuing wounded soldiers under fire in the Ia Drang Valley in November 1965. His is the only medal of valor the U.S. Army awarded to a civilian for actions during the Vietnam War. He is the co-author, with retired Lt. Gen. Hal G. Moore, of the national bestseller “We Were Soldiers Once … and Young,” which was made into the movie “We Were Soldiers,” starring Mel Gibson.

    A Reporter’s Journal From Hell
    by Joe Galloway

    Part Four: A Season in Hell

    http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0204/galloway4.htm

    The two cans went right over our heads and impacted no more than 20 yards from us,

    the jellied gasoline spreading out and flaming up going away from us.

    That 20 yards saved our lives, but through the blazing fire I could see two men, two

    Americans, dancing in that fire.

    I jumped to my feet.

    I charged on in and someone was yelling, “Get this man’s feet!”

    I reached down and grabbed the ankles of a horribly burned soldier.

    They crumbled and the skin and flesh, now cooked, rubbed off.

    I could feel his bare ankle bones in the palms of my hands.

    >>We carried him to the aid station.

    >>Later I would learn that his name was Jimmy D. Nakayama of Rigby, Idaho.

    >>His wife >>Trudie

    >>November 7. ??

    >>Jimmy died in an Army hospital two days later, on November 17.

    >>For a lot of years I looked for Jimmy’s wife and daughter.

    >>Last month, after the movie We Were Soldiers was released I received a letter from

    >>Jimmy’s widow.

    >>Last week a letter came from his daughter Nikki, now 36 years old and the mother of

    >>two young sons.

    >>No single day has passed since that long-ago November day that I have not thought

    >>about Jimmy Nakayama,

    >>the young woman who loved him,

    >>and the daughter who would never know a father’s love.

    When Did Galloway meet Lt. Col. Moore, Sgt. Maj. Plumley?

    did Galloway load wounded when they landed on LZ Xray?

    Joe Galloway has boarded Moore’s, Plumley’s Huey’s on the morning of Nov 10,1965

    and they dont even know it.

    http://digitaljournalist.org/issue0204/galloway3.htm

    by Joe Galloway A Reporters Report from hell.

    Part Three: The Things We Carried…

    ref from the Digital Journalist, We Were Soldiers Once and Young hardback

    story 1
    Galloway meets Lt. Col. Moore, Sgt.

  4. What Joe Lee Galloway thinks and write in private.
    In a letter to Hal G. Moore, Joe Lee Galloway wrote.
    from Hal Moore A Soldier ……Once and Always by MIKE GUARDIA page 171-172
    BUT, JOE LEE GALLOWAY’S TRUE FEELING ABOUT THE VIETNAM VETERAN.

    Quote: Joe Lee Galloway:” Damed if I’d want to go for a walk in the sun with them.”

    Quote: Joe Lee Galloway: “Black GI’s going thru long involved black power identification rituals.”

    Quote: Joe Lee Galloway: “THE REST ARE JUST COMMITTING SUICIDE.”

    A poem read by Joe Lee Galloway

    Quote: Joe Lee Galloway: Here dead we lie

    Because we did not choose

    To live and shame the land

    from which we sprung

    Life to be sure

    Vietnam 1965.

    Joe Lee Galloway ” THIS WAR WE CAN’T WIN” March 1965 with the Marines ,I was(disabused )
    of that notion pretty early on with the( Marines.)

    disabuse = Free from Error, Fallacy or Misconception.

    Joe Lee Galloway’s admiration of the enemy’s”the PAVN,” fighting skills, to that of the Americans.

    Quote: Joe Lee Galloway: The Marines were frustrated.
    The enemy was everywhere and nowhere.
    In the best traditions of Muhammed Ali, they danced like a butterfly and stung like a bee.

    And then they were gone and very hard to find among the population.

    Interview with Joe Galloway: Soldier’s Reporter Speaks His Mind
    Joe lee Galloway “I had read Ernie Pyle’s columns and his collected work and I thought if a war comes along in my generation.”

    Joe Lee Galloway “I want to cover it. And preferably as Pyle covered his war.”

    Joe Lee Galloway “I speak for the Vietnam Veteran.”

    +Joe Lee Galloway ” THIS WAR WE CAN’T WIN” March 1965 with the Marines ,I was(disabused )

    of that notion pretty early on with the( Marines.)

    disabuse = Free from Error, Fallacy or Misconception.

    And those guys,PAVN there was no quit in them, they came through a sea of our fire

    to close with us.

    Well, at that moment I knew they were damn good local guerrilla boys, they knew the

    terrain and all the hiding holes and we didn’t. They were very skilled at what they did

    and made do with not a lot.

    Joe Lee Galloway ” This war we can’t win.”

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